Westmount Badges

Do you remember these?

In the past, the city designed and distributed badges during their annual Family Day and Winter Carnival festivities.

I recall Beverly Adams, a former member of the Sports and Recreation Department, was responsible for involving local children in their design.

This is a sample of our collection:

 

 

 

 

Westmount Park

A (very) chilly walk through the park this evening.  The city had their 34th annual Winter Carnival today – sleigh rides, free hot dogs and maple taffy in the snow. In the past, the city would design lovely badges (with pins) for those attending this event. (I have a box full of these dating back to the 1980s  when our daughter was small).  I am sure for safety (and legal) reasons that tradtion has been discontinued.  How did we ever manage to grow up safely in the 1950 and 1960s!

 

 

Westmount Park –

A “sloppy” walk through the park this evening following the sounds of dogs barking as they enjoy their dog run.

The proposal to build their play area created a huge controversy (like most changes in Westmount)  between the City and those opposed to its construction.  Thankfully, this issue is behind us – today, both dogs and walkers enjoy this Victorian era park in a harmonious existence.

Westmount Park

Our walk through Westmount Park on Thursday evening – it was deserted, aside from several dogs enjoying their dog run.  In the past, the city employed uniformed Park Rangers whose job was to patrol the park.  Today, people walking their dogs, no matter what the weather, seem to be performing this task.

Westmount Park

Returning from a brief trip to Oxford (where there was no snow) we were greeted with the park covered in a blanket of the “white stuff”.

Kudos to the City’s Public Works for clearing the streets and sidewalks following a difficult morning with freezing rain.

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Westmount’s Summit Woods

A history of Westmount’s Summit Woods recently published in:

http://www.westmountmag.ca/summit-woods/

A history of Westmount’s
Summit Woods

How our urban forest evolved from the time it was created

By Michael Walsh
Photography by Joe Donohue

Quick question – who was the tobacco tycoon and philanthropist responsible for the city’s urban forest? The answer is Sir William Christopher Macdonald (1831-1917), founder of the W. C. Macdonald Co. that manufactured smoking and chewing tobacco. The success of the company made him a millionaire, many times over, at a young age.

… the area would not be what it is today without the vision and generosity of Sir William Christopher Macdonald, son of the 8th Laird of Glenaladale Scotland.

His philanthropy bestowed upon McGill University allowed the creation of multiple faculties and buildings as well the formation of Macdonald Campus. Interestingly, he despised the tobacco habit and changed the spelling of his last name from MacDonald to Macdonald when knighted, in 1898, to distance his association with the company’s products. The company remained in Montreal until 1974 when it was sold to R. J. Reynolds – who, in 1999, sold their non-U.S. operations to Japan Tobacco Inc. who currently manufacture their tobacco products.

The relationship between Sir William Macdonald and the City of Westmount started in when 1895 he “donated (to McGill University) a splendid region on the summit of Westmount for an observatory”.

This “splendid region” is comprised of Utica Shale (a black sedimentary rock that typically breaks into thin flat pieces) and Trenton limestone containing fossil fragments. In deeper areas the limestone forms a white marble. In oil wells, the former type of rock produces natural gas and crude oil.

The existence of the “Macdonald Observatory” was short lived – “though we cannot hope for “good seeing” within the confines of a city yearly growing blacker with factory and engine smoke, largely preventable and unnecessary”.

A fascinating article on the summit, by Andy Dodge, in the Westmount Examiner (1973) describes how, between 1906 and 1928 the McGill Survey School used concrete blocks (still visible to this day) to mount meridian telescopes to survey the stars and planets.

In 1903, the Marconi Company (today owned by the Swedish firm Ericsson and named Telent) built a receiving station on the property. Their transmitting station was located at the harbour’s Park Pier and was used for shipping.

Two years later, McGill University opposed “the Marconi Company in its plans to use the Montreal mountain summit for a wireless telegraphy station”. Their objection was that radio signals might interfere with instrumentation used in Sir Ernest Rutherford’s physics laboratory. (Amongst his other achievements, Sir Rutherford is credited with splitting the atom in 1913.)

In 1903, the Marconi Company built a receiving station on the property.

Following that period, McGill University used the area as a botanical laboratory, sharing it with the 24th Victoria Rifles of Canada as they conducted field manoeuvres.

In 1940, F. Cyril James, Principal and Vice-Chancellor of McGill University recommended “the sale of Westmount Mountain Summit to the City of Westmount”. City Council minutes provide details of the sale:

Your Committee recommend that Council authorize the purchase for use as a Park or Playground in perpetuity, the property of the Royal Institution for the Advancement of Learning, on Westmount Mountain… with the buildings thereon erected, the said property comprising all the area of approximately 1,427,288 square feet, more or less, surrounded by the street known as Summit Circle and including also the one foot strip on the west side of the southwest part of Summit Circle… the price to be paid for the said property being $300,000.00, payment to be made in three instalments of $100,000.00 each without interest, the first instalment payable upon execution of the deed of sale, the second instalment on or before January 1, 1942 and the third instalment on or before January 1, 1943, the vendors to give the City of Westmount a clear and valid title by a warranty of deed of sale in the usual form… (City of Westmount, Council Minutes, March 18, 1940)

… McGill University used the area as a botanical laboratory, sharing it with the 24th Victoria Rifles of Canada as they conducted field manoeuvres.

City Council also approved naming the area Summit Park:

Your Committee recommend that the property recently purchased by the City, bounded by Sherbrooke Street, Wood Avenue, Barat Road and Vignal Street, be named QUEEN ELIZABETH GARDENS, and that the property purchased from the Royal Institution for the Advancement of Learning, surrounded by Summit Circle, be named SUMMIT PARK. On the motion of Alderman Panet-Raymond seconded by Alderman Rexford this recommendation was unanimously adopted. (City of Westmount, Council Minutes, April 22, 1940)

During that same period, the Verdun and District Sportsmen’s Association introduced pheasants to the Summit. “This type of bird can stand severe winter conditions and it is expected that they will become permanently established” (City of Westmount Annual Report, 1940). These were cared for by the Westmount Park authorities. The pheasant population flourished and spread to a radius of 15 miles. Other changes included clearing areas for paths and ski runs. In addition, the Westmount reservoir quarry (Corporation Quarry) was also located on the summit.

In 1948, the National Research Council had an experimental radio tower and service building in Summit Park:

Your Committee recommend that the Mayor and Secretary-Treasurer be authorized to sign an agreement with the Honorary Advisory Council in Scientific and Industrial Research, prepared by the City Solicitor, whereby The Honorary Advisory Council will be permitted to erect and maintain in the western part of Summit Park, a Steel Radio tower for propagating tests and a service building or house for a generator and batteries and equipment for operating said tower, at the places marked in the plan prepared by the City Engineer, for a period of two years, at a rental of one dollar ($1.00) per year, the whole on the conditions that the tower and building will not be used for any commercial purpose and will be removed at the end of two years, and that the site will then be restored to its present condition, and that the City will be indemnified and held harmless from all claims and damages in the premises. (City of Westmount Council Minutes, March 8, 1948)

… the Verdun and District Sportsmen’s Association introduced pheasants to the Summit. These were cared for by the Westmount Park authorities.

In 1962, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, used the summit’s elevation for their radio service building:

It was moved, seconded and unanimously resolved THAT the agreement be extended between the City and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police for the use of Summit Park for a radio service building and mast for a period of two years from March 20, 1962, and that the Mayor and Secretary-Treasurer be authorized to sign the said extension on behalf of the City. (City of Westmount Council Minutes, March 5, 1962)

Today, Summit Woods (the name was changed in 2010 to reflect area’s urban forest ecology) is used by bird watchers, recreational enthusiasts, nature photographers and dog walkers. This mixed use of the area does, on occasion, cause contention between different user groups. In fact, the challenges in managing this property has been discussed in academic circles, specifically, Taryn Graham’s 2013 Master’s thesis at the University of Waterloo.

In fact, the story of Summit Woods is still unfolding. This year council approved the permanent closure of one-third of Summit Circle to create a serpentine gravel foot path. This is not a new idea, it was originally proposed in 1990 and defeated due to the logistics of providing access for emergency vehicles.

Next time you walk along the summit’s paths either alone, with your dog or carrying birding lenses remember – please stay on the paths and don’t pick any wild flowers – instead reflect on the storied history of the area. A beautiful property comprised of parcels of land that once belonged to McGill University, The Royal Bank, Estate Yuile and Estate Archibauld.

Finally, remember that the area would not be what it is today without the vision and generosity of Sir William Christopher Macdonald, son of the 8th Laird of Glenaladale Scotland.


photo: Michael Walsh

Michael Walsh is a long-time Westmount resident and a higher education IT professional. A mycologist and statistician by training. While not at work, he walks his dog and tries to impart the beauty and hidden history Westmount has to offer to residents and visitors alike through his blog at Westmount Overlooked.

Joe Donohue

Joe Donohue has frequently exhibited in Montreal, Toronto and New York. In 2007 Joe had a solo show at Harry’s Bar in Paris. His work can be found in many private and public collections, notably La Bibliothèque Nationale du Québec and the Art Gallery of Ontario. In 2008, he received a prize from the Applied Arts Photography and Illustration Magazine Awards for “Le Vieux Port”. See more of his works at joedonohuephoto.com